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Richmond Hospitals

Hospital Index

Alabama Hospital [First]

Was first located in Manchester, VA. After 1862 it was at 25th and Franklin Streets becoming General Hospital #20.

Alabama Hospital [Second]

Also known as Yarbrough's Factory Hospital; Turpin's Factory Hospital. Tobacco factory building of Turpin and Yarbrough. Southwest corner of 25th and Franklin Streets. Capacity of more than 125. Was opened before June 1862 and was still in operation in late-1863. Was attached to and part of General Hospital #21.

Alabama Hospital [Third]

Also called Robinson's Factory Hospital. Tobacco factory building of W. R. Robinson. Northwest corner of 21st and Franklin Streets. Was still open in late-1863.

Alabama Hospital [Fourth]

Mentioned as being open in 1863.

Alexander Hospital

Was opened before June 1862. Its 25 patients were transferred to Castle Godwin on 8 August 1862. Probably a prison hospital. Some where on Main Street.

Alms House Hospital

See General Hospital #1.

Atkinson Factory Hospital

Used temporarily. J. W. Atkinson's tobacco factory building. Northeast corner of 26th and Main Streets. Was in use in 1862.

Bacon & Baskerville Hospital

See General Hospital #7.

Bailey's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #2.

Baily's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #2.

Bank of Virginia Hospital

Used temporarily in June and July 1862 for South Carolina men. On southside of Main Street, between 10th and 11th Streets.

Banner Hospital

See General Hospital #12.

Baptist Church Hospital

See Fourth Street Hospital.

Baptist College Hospital

See Louisiana General Hospital.

Baptist Institute Hospital

See General Hospital #4.

Barracks Hospital

Either Stuart General Hospital or Belle Isle Hospital.

Belle Isle Hospital

Was open in September 1864 with 15 employees. Located on Belle Isle at the prison camp. Operated for a short time by the Federals.

Bellevue Hospital

Private hospital. Northwest corner of 22nd and Broad Streets. Had 51 patients in September 1861. Dr. James Bolton, in charge.

Bolton Hospital

Same as Bellevue Hospital.

Bosher's Carriage Factory Hospital

Used temporarily. Carriage factory of R. H. Bosher. Southwest corner 9th & Main Streets. Used as Quartermaster Department offices after mid-1863.

Breeden & Fox Hospital

Used temporarily in 1862. Breeden & Fox variety store building. Southeast corner of 4th and Broad Streets.

Briggs Hospital

Mentioned on an 1862 list as being at 27th and Broad Streets.

Broad Street Hotel Hospital

Used temporarily in 1861 and 1862. Broad Street Hotel, formerly the Swan Tavern. Northwest corner of 9th and Broad Streets.

Brook Hospital

Same as Saint Francis de Sales Hospital.

Buchanan Hospital

Mentioned on an undated list. Probably at Buchanan Springs around Harrison Street, north of Broad. This site was used by Federal occupation forces as hospital and encampment called Camp Williams.

Byrd Island Hospital

See General Hospital #3.

Camp Lee Hospital

Also known as Hermitage, Fair Grounds, or New Fair Grounds Hospital. September 1864 list gives 65 patients. Main Richmond training ground for Confederacy. Used by Federal occupation forces. Located just north of the Science Museum of Virginia.

Castle Thunder Hospital

See General Hospital #13.

Centenary Methodist Hospital

Basement of Centenary Methodist Church was used in 1861.

Central Hospital

Mentioned in Richmond Dispatch 25 July 1862 as "nearly vacant"

Chaffin's Bluff Hospital

Located behind the lines at Chaffin's Bluff. On F. Gunn's farm. Daniel H. Tucker, superintendent.

Chimborazo Hospital

An extremely large hospital facility constructed after the outbreak of was and first opened 17 October 1861. It was on land bound by the present streets of Clay on the north, 30th on the west, 34th on the east, and the bottom of the hill on the south. The Richmond National Battlefield Park building stands in about the middle of the old hospital grounds. Named for the hill on which it was located which was named after Mount Chimborazo in Equador. One of the largest of all military hospitals up to its time. Normal occupancy was about 3,000. It had about 120 buildings in all. Those for patients were divided into five divisions. It had its own ice house, soup house, bakery, soap factory, etc., operated its own farms, beef and goat herds, canal trading boat. Divisions were designated for Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, Maryland, at the beginning, but names varied at different periods. Medical staff about 45. Had natural springs. It claimed to have handled 17,000 wounded cases. Dr. James B. McCaw, surgeon-in-chief. Operated by Federal occupation forces for several weeks.

Christian & Lea Hospital

            See General Hospital #13.

City Guard Barracks Hospital

See Stuart General Hospital.

City Home Hospital

See General Hospital #1.

Clopton Hospital

Private hospital in the fourth house west of northwest corner of 4th and Franklin Streets. Used by Confederacy temporarily.

Clay Street Hospital

            Private hospital in the Clay Street Chapel, near Brooke Avenue. Open in 1861

College Hospital

See Medical College of Virginia Hospital.

Company G Hall Hospital

See General Hospital #27.

Conner Hospital

Mentioned on a 1864 list.

Crawford's Saloon Hospital

See Ezell Hospital.

Crew's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #15.

Danville Railroad Hospital

See General Hospital #28.

Dibrell Warehouse Hospital

Opened in June 1862, irregular usage. Northwest corner 20th and Cary Streets.

Dill Springs Hospital

On an 1864 list. Probably near Meadow Bridge Road, north of the City.

Drewry's Bluff Hospital

Located in the fortifications at Drewry's Bluff.

Eastern Military District Hospital

See General Hospital #13.

Engineering Bureau Hospital

Northeast corner of 19th and Cary Streets. Opened 9 November 1862 for use of African American laborers working on construction of fortifications. A list in 1862 shows 196 patients.

Epps Hospital

Used temporarily the home of Councilman Thomas C. Epps, 20 East Baker Street, for North Carolina troops in 1861 and 1862.

Ezell Hospital

Tenth Street, between Main and Cary. Formerly building of Crawford's Saloon. Opened 4 July 1862. Private hospital operated by J. B. Ezell of South Carolina.

Factory Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Fair Grounds Hospital

See Camp Lee Hospital.

Florida Hospital

On list in 1862 at 15th and Cary Streets, but see General Hospital #11.

Fourth Street Hospital

Also known as Baptist Church Hospital; Baptist Fourth Street Hospital. On 4th Street, north of Leigh. Operated 21 September 1861. Operated by the ladies of the First Baptist Church.

Gangrene Hospital

See General Hospital #7

Garrison Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Georgia Hospital [First]

See General Hospital #16.

Georgia Hospital [Second]

See General Hospital #14.

Georgia Hospital [Third]

See General Hospital #19.

Georgia Hospital [Fourth]

See General Hospital #17.

General Hospital #1

Also called: The General Hospital, City Home Hospital, Alms House Hospital. Built shortly before the outbreak of the Civil War by the City of Richmond as a poor house. Rented by the City Council to the Confederate authorities in June 1861 as a military hospital. Continued in use as such until December 1864 when it was reclaimed by the City for rental to the Virginia military Institute as their temporary location. Suffered heavy exterior damage when the nearby powder magazine was exploded on evacuation night. Taken over by Federal authorities and again used by them as a poor house. Returned to the City in December 1865. It was used for many years as the City Alms House. Still in use and owned by the City of Richmond. Earliest use by the Confederacy was for wounded Union prisoners. Soon became the first of the large General Hospitals. Capacity about 500 patients. Dr. Charles Bell Gibson, surgeon-in-charge. Location: northside of Hospital Street, between 2nd and 4th Streets, opposite Shockoe Cemetery.

General Hospital #2

Also called: Bailey's Factory Hospital, Baily's Factory Hospital. Tobacco factory of S. W. Bailey and Company, used in 1861 and 1862, perhaps later. Three storied, A-roofed building. Faced on southside Cary Street, southwest corner of 7th Street. Dr. James M. Holloway, in charge.

General Hospital #3

Also called: Byrd Island Hospital, Gilliam's Factory Hospital, Gilham's Hospital. Tobacco factory of George W. Gilliam and Brother Company. Taken over by the Confederacy as a hospital 15 August 1861. Capacity about 225 patients. Dr. Alexander Yelverton P. Garnett, surgeon-in-charge. Location: near south end of 9th Street, near the James River.

General Hospital #4

Also called: Baptist Institute Hospital, Officers' Hospital, Institute Hospital. Formerly the Richmond Female Institute, a Baptist school for girls. Four-storied, turreted building. 1862. Opened in mid-1861, it was still in operation in late-1864. Capacity over 300 patients. Dr. James P. Reed, surgeon-in-charge. For use of officers only after 8 January 1863. Building stood until the school was merged with University of Richmond [Baptist] in 1914. Replaced by the Virginia Mechanics Institute building. Location: facing eastside of 10th Street, just north of Marshall. Used as an office building by Federal occupation forces.

General Hospital #5

Also called: Kent Hospital. Formerly the building of Kent, Paine and Company, dry goods, "the first ‘New York style’ department store in Richmond." Opened before June 1862 with 97 patients. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Location: southside of Main Street between 11th and 12th Streets. Approximately the present numbers 1107-1109 East Main Street.

General Hospital #6

Also called: Keen Hospital. Formerly the building of Keen, Baldwin and Company, dry goods. Opened before June 1862 with 86 patients. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Location: northside of Main Street near intersection of Governor Street. Approximately present 1306 East Main Street.

General Hospital #7

Also called: Bacon and Baskerville hospital, Receiving and Wayside Hospital, Receiving and Way Hospital; Formerly the building of Bacon and Baskerville, wholesale grocers and commission merchants. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Location: northeast corner of 12th and Cary Streets, facing Cary. Present site numbered 1200-2-4 East Cary.

General Hospital #8

Also called: Saint Charles Hospital. Formerly the building of Saint Charles Hotel. Opened as early as July 1861. Cost partially borne by the City of Richmond. Had 460 patients on 13 August 1861. Was open as late as fall-1863. H. A. Dudley, superintendent. Built in 1846 on site of ancient Bowler's and Bell taverns. Location: northeast corner of Wall [15th] and Main Streets, facing Main.

General Hospital #9

Also called: Seabrook's Hospital, Receiving Hospital, Receiving and Wayside Hospital, Receiving and Way Hospital, Receiving and Distributing Hospital. Formerly the municipal-owned public warehouse known as Seabrook. Built in 1810 by John Seabrook as a tobacco warehouse, it was acquired by the City. Used for a century before its demolition. Known as "the billboard of Richmond" because it was always well "papered" with show and circus sheets, announcements, and political placards. Opened about June 1862, was still used late in the War. Functioned as a receiving hospital because of its nearness to Virginia Central Railroad depot. Capacity over 900 patients with about 150 employees. Report of October 1864 showed for July-August-September; 10,100 patients entered; 9,663 transferred; 96 died; 341 on hand. Dr. John James Gravatt, surgeon-in-charge. Location: northside of Grace Street between 17th and 18th Streets.

General Hospital #10

Also called: Union Hospital, Union Hotel Hospital, United States Hotel Hospital. Formerly the Union Hotel. This unique building was rich in local history. Built in 1817 by Dr. John Adams and designed by Richmond’s first architect Otis Manson. The Union was the first real hotel to be built in the City. Used by the medical College of Virginia as its fist Richmond home when it was begun here in 1838. After 1845 reopened as a hotel and named United Sates Hotel. A Confederate hospital from July 1862 to close of the War. Was for many years the home of Richmond Theological Seminary from which developed the present Virginia Union University. In its latter years was the home of Richmond Methodist Mission. Torn down 1911. Generally used for officers. Dr. William A. Carrington, surgeon-in-charge. Capacity was over 300 patients. Location: southwest corner of 19th and Main Streets, facing on Main. Present site numbered 1821-3-5 East Main Street.

General Hospital #11

Also called: Globe Hospital, Florida Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of James H. Grant and Company (not to be confused with his brother William’s factory, see General Hospital #12). Built 1853. Still standing partially. Records cover June 1862 through September 1863. Capacity seems to be about 150. Location: westside of first block of north 19th Street, near Franklin. Present site of 8-10-12 North 19th Street.

General Hospital #12

Also called: Banner Hospital, Grant Hospital, Wayside Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of William H. Grant. Designed by Samuel Freeman and built in 1853. Opened 2 December 1861. Libby Prison Hospital attached to its operation. Designated as Wayside Hospital for men on furlough or honorable discharge on 6 August 1863. Used as barracks by Federal occupation forces. Capacity over 250. Location: northeast corner of 19th and Franklin Streets.

General Hospital #13

Also called: Castle Thunder Hospital, Prison Hospital, Lunatic Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of Christian and Lea company. Four-storied, flat-roofed, brick building. Opened before June 1862. Hospital for prisoners at Castle Thunder and mental cases. At first mental patients were kept at Castle Thunder in quarters with 50 capacity. Then moved to this builidng with other prison patients. Capacity over 150, employees over 30. Dr. W. W. Coggin, surgeon-in-charge. Used for a short time by Federal occupation forces. Location: eastside of 20th Street, between Main and Franklin Streets. Present site 21-3 North 20th Street.

General Hospital #14

Also called: Second Georgia Hospital. Building about same size and shape as General Hospital #11. Opened before June 1862. Report of 7 June 1862 lists 65 patients, but capacity was over 125. Location: westside of 20th, between Main and Franklin Streets. Present site: 20-4-6 North 20th Street.

General Hospital #15

Also called: Crew's Hospital, Crew and Pemberton Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of Crew and Pemberton, Four-storied, brick building. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Opened about June 1862. Capacity over 200. Drs. H. C. Scott, G. B. Moore, W. T. Bell, in charge. After 25 September 1862 converted to barracks for convalescent or traveling solders. Location: northwest corner of 21st and Cary Streets.

General Hospital #16

Also called: First Georgia Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of john E. Whitlock and Company. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Opened before June 1862. Report of 7 June 1862 lists 66 patients, but capacity was over 130. Location: westside of 21st Street; between Main and Cary Streets.

General Hospital #17

Also called: Fourth Georgia Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of Smith and McCurdey. Destroyed in evacuation fire. Opened 19 May 1862. Report of 7 June 1862 lists 86 patients, but capacity was over 125. Location: westside of 21st Street, between Main and Cary Streets, about mid-block, just north of General Hospital #16.

General Hospital #18

Also called: Greaner’s Factory Hospital, Greanor’s Factory Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of John H.Greaner (not to be confused with his father William’s factory at 19th and Cary Streets). Built in 1853. John H. Greaner was long a member of the Richmond City Council and a distinguished soldier in the Confederate army. Although the name was legally spelled Greaner, the family often used Greanor. Opened in Spring 1861. On 25 September 1861 it listed 260 patients. Turned into Confederate shoe factory 2 June 1864 with 300 employees. Location: eastside of 22nd Street, between Main and Franklin Streets at 9 North 22nd Street.

General Hospital #19

Also called: Third Georgia Hospital. Probably tobacco factory of A. W. Taylor Company. Four-storied, dormer-roofed building. Opened June 1862. Capacity over 75. Closed December 1863. Location: probably southeast corner of 24th and Franklin Streets.

General Hospital #20

Also called: Royster’s Hospital, First Alabama Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of J. B. and A. L. Royster for Royster Brothers and Company). Opened before June 1862 lists 44 patients, but building had a very large capacity. Location: just south of Franklin Street on eastside of 25th Street.

General Hospital #21

Also called: Gwalthmey Factory Hospital, Gwathmey Factory Hospital, Gwathney Factory Hospital, Maryland Hospital, C. S. M. Prison Hospital. Probably former tobacco facotry of R. A. Mayo Company, later Gwathmey Tobacco Company. Large six-storied, brick building. Opened before June 1862. Capacity over 700, employees 65. Used for smallpox epidemic December 1862, before these sufferers were moved to Howard’s Grove Hospital. Had 600/700 Union wounded prisoners May and June 1864. Straw vote for President by these men 9 November 1864: Lincoln 154, McClellan 300. Dr. George William Semple, surgeon-in-charge. Used for a short time by Federal occupation forces. Location: northwest corner of 25th and Cary Streets, west of General Hospital #24.

General Hospital #22

Also called: Howard’s Factory Hospital, Howard Hospital, North Carolina Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of George D. Howard Company. Three-storied, A-roofed, brick building. Opened in 1862. Closed 22 July 1864. Capacity about 110 employees 44. Dr. Addison C. Fox, surgeon-in-charge. "Praised for good work with desperate cases" on 19 May 1863. Location: southside of Main Street, between 25th and 26th Streets, west of General hospital #24.

General Hospital #23

Also called: Ligon’s Factory Hospital, Liggon Factory Hospital, Ligion Factory Hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of John L. Ligon. Opened 31 May 1862. Used sometimes as Union Prison hospital. Was still open in fall-1864. Employees 45. Location: southeast corner of 25th and Main Streets.

General Hospital #24

Also called: Moore’s Hospital, Harwood’s Hospital, North Carolina hospital. Formerly tobacco factory of George D. Harwood. Three-storied, flat-roofed, brick building. Opened summer-1861. First used for Union prisoners. Capacity over 120., employees 30. Taken over by North Carolina 29 July 1864. Rosa Lee Sanzay, matron. Dr. Otis Frederick Manson, surgeon-in-charge. Location: southwest corner of 26th and Main Streets.

General Hospital #25

Also called: Randolph’s Hospital, Texas and Arkansas Hospital. Open as early as March 1862 and as late as July 1863. Capacity about 225, employees 25, in March 1863. Union Prisoners at times. Location: center of block south of Main Street, between Pear and Peach Streets.

General Hospital #26

Also called: Springfield Hall Hospital, Masonic hall Hospital. Formerly meeting hall owned by Springfield Division #167, Sons of Temperance. Also used by Henrico Union Lodge #130, A. F. and A. M. Roane Lodge #130, I. O. O. F. Two-storied, brick building. Built 1850. Opened early June 1861. Capacity about 40, employees 7. Dr. John Know, surgeon-in-charge. When opened operated by Soldiers’ Aid Society in association with Trinity Methodist and Leigh Street Baptist churches. Location: northwest corner of 26th and M Streets.

General Hospital #27

Also called: Gangrene Hospital, Company G Hall Hospital. Formerly social, meeting and drill hall operated by Militia Co. G. Opened March 1862. Closed 16 July 1863. Capacity about 50. Location: eastside of 28th Street, between M and N Streets. Present site approximately 711-3 North 28th Street.

General Hospital #28

Also called: Danville Railroad hospital, Railroad Shops Hospital. Formerly shops building in railroad repair yards of Richmond and Danville Rail Road. Single-storied, brick, building. Had several natural springs nearby. Opened 10 July 1862. Surgical hospital with 416 beds. Dr. Abraham Schultz Miller, surgeon-in-charge. Location: Manchester, Virginia, on James River, just east of Richmond and Petersburg Rail Road bridge. Present site just east of south end of Manchester Bridge.

Gilliam's Hospital

See General Hospital #3.

Ginter, Alvey and Arents' Hospital

Opened temporarily in June 1862. Warehouse of Ginter, Alvey and Arents. Corner 13th and Main Streets.

Globe Hospital

See General Hospital #11.

Globe Tavern Hospital

See General Hospital #11.

Grant Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #12.

Greanor's Hospital

See General Hospital #18.

Gwalthmey Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #21.

Hardgrove's Factory Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list, but was probably General Hospital #24.

Harwood's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #24.

Henningsen Hospital

Private hospital under direction of Mrs. Henningsen. Southside of Franklin, between New and Wall Streets. Suspended for military use 10 December 1863. 1862/3 average shows 75 patients, 30 employees. Surgeon-in-charge, Dr. D. J. Watson; with Drs. B. Roemer and William T. Goldsmith.

Hermitage Hospital

See Camp Lee Hospital.

Howard's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #22.

Howard's Grove Hospital

The Grove was originally a popular Richmond picnic-recreation area. It was taken over by the Confederacy at the outbreak of the War as a drill and bivouac point for the first incoming troops to arrive in Richmond. Converted into a hospital area by the construction of buildings for ward and utility purposes and opened in June 1862. Occupied area now confined by the City streets of Mechanicsville Turnpike in the east, Coalter street in the west, Redd Street on the north, and Q Street (extended) on the south; and having an extension east of Mechanicsville Turnpike to 19th Street with T Street on the north and Fairmount Avenue on the south. An annex was located between 21st and 23rd Streets, T Street, and the ally south of Fairmount Avenue. Having a capacity of 659 in December of 1862. It was quickly expanded to over 1800. Employees averaged 85. A portion was set aside for the isolation of smallpox cases, both military and local civilians. It had its own laundry, bakery, storehouses, water supply, recreational facilities. Total of 62 buildings. Partially subsidized by the City of Richmond. Surgeons-in-chief (in order of their service): Dr. James Bolton, Dr. T. P. Temple, Dr. P. M. Palmer. Continued as Union Small pox Hospital after the City’s occupation. Named for the family (Howard) that originally owned the property.

Howard's Warehouse Hospital

See Naval Hospital.

Institute Hospital

See General Hospital #4.

Jackson General Hospital

Located "in the western suburbs beyond Hollywood Cemetery." It was bounded by the present City streets of Idlewood Avenue on the north, Jacquelin Street on the south, Allen Avenue in the west, and Lombardy Street in the east. A common military road (present Allen Avenue) joined it with Winder Hospital. Opened 29 June 1863 "midway between Camp Lee and Winder." It had 40 acres of gardens and an excellent library. Original capacity was 1980, but it was reported to have been enlarged to, or able to handle, 2500. 9 May 1864 it was reported to be "filled with North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia troops from battles" in northern Virginia. Named for General Thomas J. Jackson, it had 49 buildings. Furnished three companies of African American Confederate troops from amongst employees. They served "in the lines under fire" and had " a public drill in the Capitol Square" along with those from Winder Hospital. Their company commanders were: Captains A. Lockett, W. M. Baxley, and T. R. Calvin, in March 1865. Used by Federal occupation forces until 30 September 1865 for Confederate prisoners.

Keen, Baldwin and Company Hospital

See General Hospital #6.

Kent, Paine and Company Hospital

See General Hospital #5.

Lanier and Company's Warehouse Hospital

Located in Lanier and Company’s warehouse in basement of Spotswood Hotel. Opened 2 July 1862. Later used by CSA Post Office Department.

Libby Prison Hospital

Located in a room in Libby Prison for use of inmates. John Wilkins in charge to mid-1864. Dr. George William Semple, afterwards. Enlarged and operated by Federal occupation forces as John Wythe Hospital.

Liggon's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #23.

Liggon's and Howard's Hospital

See General Hospitals #22 and #23.

Ligon's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #22.

Ligon's Home Hospital

Home of John L. Ligon, 2601 East Franklin Street. Used in 1861.

Lightfoot Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Louisiana General Hospital

Also called: Richmond College Hospital, Baptist College Hospital. The main building of Richmond College [Baptist] known as "Columbia" was taken for joint operation by Confederate government and Louisiana Hospital Committee. Probably other buildings on grounds were used also. The building is still standing with an annex wing attached and located on the northeast corner of Lombardy and Grace Streets. The college grounds were the area now embraced by the City streets of Lombardy Street in the west, Broad Street on the north, Monument Avenue on the south, and about half a block east of Ryland Street in the east. Opened 4 June 1862. It had 120 patients in September 1864, but its capacity was higher. Dr. W. C. Nicholls, surgeon-in-charge. John H. Mackenzie, resident agent for Louisiana Hospital Committee. Building and grounds used by Federal occupation forces as hospital and encampment under the name of Camp Casey. Lt. Col. James Brady of 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery, commanding.

Lunatic Hospital

Part of General Hospital #13.

Main Street Hospital

Tobacco factory of W. B. Ross. Northwest corner of 26th and Main Streets. Opened 3 September 1861 for Union prisoners. Had 300 patients on 1864 list. Drs. Vest, Taylor and Hancock. Attached to General Hospital #21.

Manchester Baptist Church Hospital

Present Bainbridge Street Baptist Church. 1101 Bainbridge Street. Use of a basement as temporary hospital in 1862.

Marine Hospital

See Naval Hospital.

Marshall Springs Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list, possibly Buchanan Springs

Masonic Hall Hospital

1805 East Franklin Street. Used in 1861 and 1862. Had 30 patients on 25 September 1861.

Mayo's Warehouse Hospital

Tobacco warehouse located east of the northern approach to Mayo's Bridge across the James River. Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Medical College of Virginia Hospital

Located on the present site of the Medical Sciences Building on the Medical College of Virginia campus of Virginia Commonwealth University. Used for Confederate wounded from 1861 through 1864. State operated. Had 68 patients on 25 September 1861.

Metropolitan Hall Hospital

Variety theatre, formerly First Presbyterian church building. Northside of Franklin Street, between Governor and 14th. Used temporarily from June 1862.

Mississippi Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Moore's Hospital

See General Hospital #24.

Naval Hospital

Also known as Marine Hospital. Howard’s warehouse building. Govern Street, eastside, between Franklin and Main Streets. Open as early as 1861, as late as 1863.

North Carolina Hospital

See General Hospitals #22 and #24.

North Carolina Soldiers' Home

Corner 19th and Main Streets, probably in what had been General Hospital #10. Opened 6 November 1864 for convalescent North Carolina soldiers from General Hospital #24. Directed by Dr. Otis Frederick Manson.

Old Dominion Hospital

See Medical College of Virginia.

Orthopediac [sic] Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Pleasants and Frazier Factory Hospital

Corner 20th and Franklin Streets. Opened 30 September 1861 for Georgia soldiers, probably an annex to General Hospital #14. Capacity 300.

Prison Hospital

Name for parts of General Hospitals #13 and #21.

Private Quarters Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list. Probably wounded cared for in various personal homes were tabulated under this heading.

Public Guard Hospital

Northeast corner of 5th and Byrd Streets. Was open as late as mid-1863.

Randolph's Factory Hospital

See General Hospital #25.

Receiving and Wayside Hospital

See General Hospital #7 and #9

Richardson and Company Hospital

Also known as Richardson’s and Dooley’s. Southside of main Street, east of 14th [Pearl]. Formerly drygoods and carpet store of B. W. and R. P. Richardson. Used temporarily in June and July 1862. William A. Carrington, Surgeon-in-charge.

Richmond College Hospital

See Louisiana General Hospital.

Richmond Female Institute Hospital

See General Hospital #4.

Ridge Church Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Robertson Hospital

Small private hospital financially subsidized by Confederate government. In home of Judge John Robertson. Northwest corner of 3rd and Main Streets. Opened from June 1862 through February 1865 with periods of closing. Capacity 22 patients. Miss Sally L. Tompkins, in charge. John Taylor, steward.

Robinson's Factory Hospital

See Third Alabama Hospital.

Ross Factory Hospital

See Main Street Hospital.

Royster's Hospital

See General Hospital #20.

Sailors' Home

Mentioned in an 863 list. Probably same as Soldiers' Home

Saint Charles Hospital

See General Hospital #8.

Saint Francis De Sales Hospital

Also known as St. Francis; Catholic; Brook Hospital. On Brook Turnpike at City Limits (near Bacon Quarter Branch). [Approximately in cloverleaf leading north Belevidere Street traffic into Interstate 95.] Had formerly been Goddin’s Tavern. Small religious operated hospital financially subsidized by Confederate government. Opened June 1862, still in use in February 1865. Sister Juliann in charge. Capacity 30 patients. Some female Confederate prisoners held here.

Samaritan Hospital

Private hospital financially aided by Confederate government. Clay Street, between 5th and 6th. Formerly Stewart’s School House. Mrs. Philip Mayo, manager. Average capacity 90 with 4 employees.

Seabrooks Warehouse Hospital

See General Hospital #9.

Seaman's Bethel Hospital

20th Street, between Main and Cary. Formerly a small mission church subsidized by the City for use as a school. Used temporarily. For Union wounded with gangrene.

Shoe Depot Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list.

Small Pox Hospital

Located at various places, but generally at Howard’s Grove Hospital.

Soldiers' Home

Early temporary location 7th and Cary Streets. Permanent location on corner of Henry and Clay Streets. Capacity about 40. Still open 1865.

Soldiers' Rest

Probably same as Soldiers' Home.

South Carolina Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list as near Mayo’s bridge in Manchester, probably in one of the buildings of Manchester Cotton Factories Company.

Spotswood Hotel Hospital

Southeast corner of 8th and Main Streets. Spotswood Hotel building. Used temporarily in 1861. Also see Lanier’s Warehouse Hospital.

Springfield Hall Hospital

See General Hospital #26.

Stewart's School House Hospital

See Samaritan Hospital.

Stuart General Hospital

Also called: Old Fair Grounds Hospital, Fort Stuart Hospital, Barracks Hospital. It occupied the ground now within the limits of the municipal-owned Monroe Park, though at that time the grounds extended north to Broad Street. The present boundaries are Franklin, Main, Laurel, and Belvidere Streets. Up to 1859 had been the State Fair Grounds which were moved to Hermitage. Used as a drill and assembly ground from the early days of the War under various names. Later in the War was the home camp of City Guard. Became Stuart Hospital 2 June 1864 by converting City Guard barracks. Had 16 buildings. Employees listed as 124 in 1864. Treatment hospital with beds for about 500. Named for General J. E. B. Stuart. Dr. S. Meredith, surgeon-in-charge; later, Dr. R. A. Lewis. Taken over by Federal occupation forces and operated as: Post Hospital 13 April-3 August 1865; General Hospital 4 August-1 December 1865; post Hospital 2 December-31 December 1865 under the name of Camp Winthrop. Dr. William H. Palmer, surgeon-in-charge.

Swan Tavern Hospital

See Broad Street Hotel Hospital

Sycamore Hospital

Eastside of 11th Street, north of Broad. Sunday school rooms of Sycamore Disciples of Christ Church were used temporarily in late-1861. Capacity about 40 patients.

Temperance Hall Hospital

See General Hospital #26.

Temperance Hotel Hospital

Southwest corner of 5th and Hull Streets. Also known as Old Masonic Hall Hospital. Used temporarily in 1862.

Texas Hospital

See General Hospital #25.

Turpin's Factory Hospital

See Second Alabama Hospital.

Turpin and Yarbrough Factory Hospital

See Second Alabama Hospital.

Union Hall Hospital

Mentioned in an 1862 list. Probably either General Hospitals #10 or #26.

United States Hotel Hospital

See General Hospital #10.

Warwick Hospital

Mentioned in 1862 list as "five miles from Richmond," Probably at the Warwick Estate. North of Brook Run and east of Brook Turnpike. Had 32 patients on 24 September 1861.

Wayside Hospital

See General Hospital #12.

Winder Hospital

This vast hospital complex was constructed shortly after the outbreak of the War at what was then called "western terminus of Cary Street." It was on land now east of the present municipal-owned William Byrd Park (which was then the training grounds known as Camp Jackson) with an annex in the park area to the south of the present Fountain lake and to the east of the Reservoir. The hospital's boundaries would be the present City streets of Winder, Amelia, and Hampton Streets, and Allen Avenue. To the north of Winder Hospital was Jackson Hospital with which it shared some of its activities. “The largest hospital in the Confederacy,” Richmond Whig 15 June 1864. Opened with a capacity in excess of 3000, it quickly expanded to 4300. Originally divided into five divisions, a sixth was added plus a tent division for an additional 700 patients. It had numerous natural springs, deep wells, large library, central register of patients, information house, cook-houses, bakeries, food-processing facilities, employees barracks, treatment and surgical buildings, warehouses, 125 acres of farmland used for growing supplies, recreational facilities, bathhouses, etc., provided regular transportation service to downtown, operated own river and canal boats. It had 98 buildings. Named for General John Henry Winder who was appointed 21 June 1861 as Provost Marshal and commander of prisons in Richmond. Dr. Alexander G. Lane, surgeon-in-charge. A fire 21 January 1864 destroyed 2nd Division with a loss of $50,000 but with no injuries or death. The hospital maintained its own well-equipped fire brigade. A volunteer force made up of attendants and patients under Lt. Col. A. S. Cunningham served actively a the Battle of North Anna. Later a battalion was former with Jackson Hospital under the Command of Dr. Major Chambliss that saw active duty in the battles of 1865. Formed February 1865 a company of Negro soldiers under Captain Grimes, which saw active service with those from Jackson. Used with Camp Jackson by Federal occupation forces as hospital and encampment area. Called Camp Grant. Western annex was headquarters and encampment for XXIVth Army Corps. Numerous of the former ward buildings still standing in the area and have been converted into homes, particularly on Powhatan Street.

Yarborough Factory Hospital

Same as Second Alabama Hospital and attached to General Hospital #21. Turned over to the care of Union wounded in 1864.

YMCA Hospital

Tenth Street, between Main and Cary Streets. Operated with private funds

Unnamed Hospitals:

Hospital was opened 7 July 1862 on Cary Street, between 11th and 12th Streets.

23 July 1862, the patients in the hospitals in "sundry stores on east Main Street, below 14th have been transferred to regular hospitals."

All of the Richmond Public School buildings were used off and on.


Posted By: Joe Elia
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